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PERU PRESIDENT LEARNS FLYING'S NOT ALWAYS FUN

First, Peru's President Alberto Fujimori had to fly in coach. Then an American Airlines employee searched his luggage."It seems impertinent, unacceptable to me that a common employee of American Airlines searched my baggage," Fujimori told reporters in Lima. "What they should be doing is looking into whether American Airlines employees are smuggling drugs."

Fujimori complained he was bumped to economy class despite having a first-class ticket for a flight from Kansas City to Dallas last weekend.

Fujimori did not say in which airport his bags were searched. "To do this to the president of the republic is not proper conduct," he said.

The airline issued a statement Thursday expressing "our deepest apology" and promising "appropriate corrective action."

COMEDIAN MULL PREFERS PAINTING TO PERFORMING

It may require a leap of faith to take a satirist seriously, but Martin Mull said his paintings are for true believers.

Mull, who stars in "Sabrina the Teenage Witch," is exhibiting a series of abstract paintings at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art in Omaha, Neb. He says he's serious about exploring his childhood and his psyche through art.

"It's the great irony of my life," Mull said. "I have always considered myself first and foremost a painter -- that's where my heart and soul is. The other stuff I did to pay the bills so I could paint."

NO REGRETS FOR DRUMMER WHO QUIT STONES IN '63

Thirty-six years ago, drummer Carlo Little decided to quit a struggling rock band.

This weekend that band, the Rolling Stones, will perform before tens of thousands of fans at London's Wembley stadium, while Little will sell burgers and hot dogs outside.

Little, 60, told the Express newspaper he played with the Stones before they hit the big time in the 1960s.

"I couldn't carry on with them as they only had a few gigs lined up and could only offer me a couple of quid (pounds) for each gig," he said. "I have no regrets, even though I could have become a millionaire, but then I remember that I'm alive and happy."

5 RECIPIENTS AWARDED JAPAN'S TOP ART PRIZES

Jazz pianist Oscar Peterson and choreographer Pina Bausch are among five recipients of the 1999 Praemium Imperiale, considered Japan's Nobel Prize for the arts.

The three others honored in a ceremony at Lincoln Center were painter Anselm Kiefer, sculptor Louise Bourgeois and architect Fumihiko Maki.

"I have to say thank you not only on my behalf but on behalf of the music I represent -- jazz," said Peterson, 74.