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IT'S ABOUT STAR POWER

Chrissie Hynde is looking forward to joining the female-dominated Lilith Fair concerts this summer. But to her, the concept is more about star power than girl power. "It's show business, isn't it?" the leader of The Pretenders told the Boston Globe.N.D. GOVERNOR HONORS VEE WITH ROUGH RIDER AWARD

When singer Bobby Vee played Bismarck, N.D., years ago, Gov. Ed Schafer would sometimes lend the North Dakota native a few 1950s cars for ambience.

On Sunday, Schafer presented Vee with something more permanent -- the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Award, the state's highest honor.

"I've had gold records, and I've had some wonderful honors from a business standpoint," Vee said. "But for somebody from your home state to slap you on the back and say, 'Good job,' that's a whole different deal."

Vee, 56, had six gold records in the 1960s, including "Rubber Ball," "The Night has a Thousand Eyes," and "Take Good Care of My Baby," a No. 1 record in 1961. He lives in St. Cloud, Minn., and still performs regularly with The Vees, a band that includes his three sons.

MODERN R&B LACKS SOUL, SMART LYRICS, COLE SAYS

Natalie Cole, who cut her teeth on rhythm and blues, says modern R&B lacks soul.

"I mean lyrics and passion, some understanding of communicating an idea . . ," the Grammy-winning daughter of the late Nat "King" Cole told The Orange (Calif.) County Register.

"There used to be songs that I would listen to and have to go look up words in the dictionary afterward, you know? What happened to smart music like that?" she said. "I don't have to look up any of this stuff now -- and some of it I wouldn't want to look up."

Cole, whose first album in three years, "Snowfall in the Sahara," is due in stores Tuesday, isn't too fond of rap, either.

'3-HOUR TOUR' CASTAWAY STILL FAMILIAR TO WORLD FANS

Gilligan once, Gilligan always.

Though it's been more than three decades since Bob Denver and his fellow castaways made their fateful trip to "Gilligan's Island," he's still a familiar face around the world.

Denver, 64, appeared Saturday on Lake Erie's Middle Bass Island, where he spent the day signing autographs.

CBS aired 98 episodes of "Gilligan's Island" in 1964-67. But the series is syndicated in more than 30 countries, and Denver said fans still notice him as he walks through airports.

"After 35 years," he said, "it makes no difference."