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Recovery Plus drug treatment center opens near Murray IMC

Attending the dedication of substance abuse rehab center in Murray on Monday are Robert Daugherty, left, who is on the board of directors for Recovery Plus Foundation, Dr. Keith Breiland, Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley Jr. and Murray City Mayor Dan S
Attending the dedication of substance abuse rehab center in Murray on Monday are Robert Daugherty, left, who is on the board of directors for Recovery Plus Foundation, Dr. Keith Breiland, Navajo Nation President Joe Shirley Jr. and Murray City Mayor Dan Snarr.
Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

MURRAY — A new substance abuse rehabilitation center was blessed and opened to the public Monday just a hop, skip and a jump from the towering Intermountain Medical Center.

The Recovery Plus home for up to 20 patients "taps the potential" of the neighborhood near 4800 South and 50 West, according to Murray Mayor Dan Snarr. He envisions all manner of businesses and health-support centers in the area, which is part of the city's historic overlay district.

But the new center didn't come without controversy. Neighbors voiced concern that its presence would bring increased crime, said Murray Economic Development Director Tim Tingey.

Snarr said there are other drug-rehabilitation centers in Murray, including one for addicted mothers and their children and another for Alcoholics Anonymous. The latter, one of the biggest of its kind in the region, is in a chapel donated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he said.

"It's already in Murray," said Snarr, whose son died of a drug overdose. "It's been in Murray for a long time."

The privately funded rehabilitation center is the first inpatient facility for Recovery Plus, which was founded about two years ago. The company also has outpatient centers, with one near 6100 South and 150 East in Murray and one in Henderson, Nev.

The new three-story brick building stands next to a handful of small houses and dozens of light-industrial manufacturers. Its large windows provide plenty of sunlight and beautiful mountain views, but tall, opaque fences and omnipresent security cameras are meant to provide peace of mind for both patients and neighbors.

Inside, each adult participant gets his or her own bedroom and bathroom, but the kitchen, television and exercise areas are shared. Colors of muted yellow and cherry were chosen to make the center "feel like home."

"The message is bright," said John Robertson, one of two principal investors in Recovery Plus. "Lots of light helps the feeling."

Recovery Plus bills its program as high-quality but inexpensive, at about half the rates of competitors. The approach is based on cognitive behavioral therapy but tailored to individual program participants. It views addiction as a disease and uses several methods, including the 12-step system, said Recovery Plus principal and medical director Dr. Keith Breiland.

The new facility accepts many kinds of private insurance but doesn't take federal programs such as Medicare. Overall, the cost is about $500 a day or $5,000 for 30 days. Besides one-on-one medical care, that includes a personal trainer, a chef, a shared hot tub and regular massage. There are 10 physicians on staff.

Robertson pointed out that Recovery Plus has financing options that, for many, are less expensive than maintaining a drug habit.

"The purpose here is not solely for profit," Robertson said. "We do change people's lives."

Future plans for the Recovery Plus center could include a job training facility and a sober living home, Robertson said. If successful, the company also could expand into the Navajo Nation.

e-mail: rpalmer@desnews.com