clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Stop drug traffic

A soldier stands in what was identified as \"metal reactors\" after a seizure of a large clandestine methamphetamine lab at a ranch in Tlajomulco de Zuniga, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, Mexico, Thursday Feb. 9, 2012.
A soldier stands in what was identified as \"metal reactors\" after a seizure of a large clandestine methamphetamine lab at a ranch in Tlajomulco de Zuniga, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, Mexico, Thursday Feb. 9, 2012.
Associated Press

Reading the story "Honduras is among most dangerous places on Earth" (April 9), I was reminded of the drug war just to the south of us in Mexico and the American thirst for drugs that has been one of the main forces behind the violence occurring in that region of the world. With the implementation of the Merida Agreement, which provided money and material support to Mexico during the Bush administration, this country finally began to act to curb the violence that had spilled over the border into Arizona, Texas and California.

This led to the use of unmanned drones to lead Mexican authorities to capture or kill more than two dozen medium to high level drug lords. However, it is not enough. Drug abuse has a high cost in terms of private and public money. It has led to corruption, kidnapping and murder in Latin America.

We must begin to explore alternative ways to stop these drug gangs that have now spread across the border to unite with existing gangs in the major cities of America.

One thing that must continue to expand is our cooperation with countries in Latin America. Together we can develop solutions to this expanding drug epidemic.

Patrick Smart

American Fork