clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Neighborhood caucuses

Votes are counted during a caucus meeting at Lone Peak High School in Highland, March 15, 2012.
Votes are counted during a caucus meeting at Lone Peak High School in Highland, March 15, 2012.
Scott G. Winterton, Deseret News

Caucuses sound like a nice get together with friends in the neighborhood. It turned out to not even be in my neighborhood or in my city. There was no parking and limited seating.

The reason we were asked to attend was to help choose delegates that would better represent the people of Utah, not just the extremists. The first thing we were shown was the party platform, a very extreme document. We were told all delegates had to agree to support every part of this platform. So much for having delegates that would represent the people of Utah.

Later each candidate was allowed one minute to explain his or her position on things. Based on that one minute, we voted.

I am glad we were encouraged to attend. Now that we all know how caucuses work, maybe we can get rid of them and start thinking seriously about returning democracy to Utah.

Richard Alvord

American Fork