clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Good SEC teams can still hit the longball

Mississippi's Zach Kirksey watches his home run against Florida during an NCAA college baseball game, Sunday, April 1, 2012, in Oxford, Miss. Mississippi won 7-6.
Mississippi's Zach Kirksey watches his home run against Florida during an NCAA college baseball game, Sunday, April 1, 2012, in Oxford, Miss. Mississippi won 7-6.
The Oxford Eagle, Bruce Newman) MAGS OUT NO SALES MANDATORY CREDIT, Associated Press

The longball hasn't completely vanished from college baseball.

In fact, homers might be more important than ever, even as changes to the sport's ubiquitous metal bats have drastically reduced offensive production.

Power numbers across college baseball have dipped drastically since the Ball-Bat Coefficient of Restitution (BBCOR) was introduced last year to deaden the powerful metal bats that made scoring so easy for decades.

From 2010 to 2011, home runs were cut by nearly 50 percent nationally. The numbers are about the same again this season.

But many of the Southeastern Conference's best teams are still finding a way to put the ball out of the park. Florida (24-5, 6-3 SEC) leads the SEC with 41 homers while Kentucky (28-2, 7-2) is right behind them with 36.