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MINI-ANALYSIS: BIDEN

Vice President Joe Biden addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012.
Vice President Joe Biden addresses the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., on Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012.
Charles Dharapak, Associated Press

Vice President Joe Biden is using his speech, at least in part, to describe the close partnership he has with the president. He is nearby as the president makes major decisions like attacking Osama bin Laden, the vice president told his audience, describing the difficulty of such calls.

"I know this man," Biden said.

Biden was initially seen, when Obama first picked him as his running mate four years ago, as a way to reassure the public that Obama would have enough experienced help around on foreign policy and national security issues. This campaign, Biden — with his blue collar background — is focusing on helping Obama where the president tends to be weak: in appealing to blue collar and swing state voters.

Much of Biden's speech has been somewhat subdued. But he got big applause with a line he often uses on the trail: that America is better off now than four years ago because "Osama bin Laden is dead and General Motors is alive."

— Sally Buzbee

EDITOR'S NOTE — Convention Watch shows you the 2012 political conventions through the eyes of Associated Press journalists. Follow them on Twitter where available with the handles listed after each item.