UTAH STATE PRISON — A man who spent years in prison for kidnapping six young girls and women says he is innocent of new allegations that he sexually abused two teenage girls.

During a parole violation hearing at the Utah State Prison on Wednesday, Andrew James Gwilliam, 35, told a Utah Board of Pardons and Parole member conducting the hearing that he is "not guilty" of the accusations.

But an agent with Adult Probation and Parole informed the board representative that even though a month has gone by since Gwilliam's arrest and no criminal charges have been filed, investigators are working with the Salt Lake County District Attorney's Office to pursue charges. Getting results from DNA evidence, he said, is taking extra time.

Gwilliam's attorney, Michael Holje, declined to go into detail but said he has spoken with his client about what happened.

"I do believe there's an awful lot more to this story that hasn't been presented. I think what is out there in the public right now is factually inaccurate, and I think if this investigation continues, you'll likely see that play out," he said.

Until then, Gwilliam will remain in prison for investigation of violating his parole until either criminal charges are filed or the allegations are proved false.

The investigation into Gwilliam began on Nov. 6 when police were called to the Hampton Inn, 3923 W. Center Park Drive, on a report of two 14-year-old girls being "held hostage and … sexually assaulted," according to a search warrant affidavit filed in 3rd District Court.

The girls originally told detectives that a car with three men, driven by Gwilliam, pulled up as they were walking along 6200 South to go to a 7-Eleven and forced them to get inside. The girls originally told police that Gwilliam ordered them to "be quiet or he (would) kill them," the warrant states.

But a couple of days after Gwilliam was arrested, police announced they were no longer looking for two additional men, and they were no longer pursuing kidnapping charges against Gwilliam. The investigation into allegations of forcible sexual abuse, however, continued.

The girls told police that Gwilliam attempted to sexually assault them inside a hotel room. But since those initial interviews, West Jordan police have characterized the girls as being "uncooperative" with detectives.

Gwilliam spent nearly a decade behind bars for kidnapping six young girls and women — ranging in age from 12 to 20 — over a seven-month period in the Sandy area between 2001 and 2002. During Gwilliam's sentencing hearing in 2003, his defense attorney noted that Gwilliam began behaving strangely after suffering a severe head injury while serving a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and that his neurological problems could be treated with medication and therapy.

Gwilliam was released from prison in January 2012. As part of the conditions of his parole, he was not allowed to have unauthorized contact with children.

Because the investigation into the new allegations is still underway, Gwilliam's hearing on Wednesday was continued for 30 days. For the purpose of the parole violation hearing, Gwilliam was asked to enter a plea to the allegations, which he responded, "Not guilty."

If charges are filed against Gwilliam in the next month, his parole violation hearing will be put on hold until those are adjudicated. If they aren't, Gwilliam then has the option of requesting that the new allegations be dismissed or the Board of Pardons could hold an evidentiary hearing.

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