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14 books you can read to your baby

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Jean Chatzsky is a financial editor for "The Today Show," and adults read most of her content. But recently she wanted to teach kids the same financial lessons, according to The New York Times. So, with the help of Time Kids, Chatzsky started Your $, a magazine aimed to help fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders learn financial literacy, The Times reported.

“Kids are very interested in money,” Chatzky told the Times. “What we’re trying to get across to them is money is a tool that they need to know how to manage to succeed in life."

It isn’t hard for you to find the right books or reading material for your child. Chatzky’s magazine is perfect for parents who want their kids to be financially literate. Older children, like teens, will take interest in the list of books that CNN says are perfect for teens. And mothers will certainly find Christianity Today’s recent list of books applicable to their parenting.

But what books are best for babies? Sure, babies can’t learn to read, but studies suggest that reading to your newborn baby develops their language and social skills. It also makes parents feel better about how they’re helping their child learn.

Here are 14 books parents may want to buy and read to their baby.

“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” — Eric Carle

This classic child’s book focuses on the life of a hungry caterpillar. The book includes large text and pictures that’ll have your baby hungry for more.

“Love You Forever” — Robert Munsch and Sheila McGraw

This is a go-to children’s book that shows the growth of a baby into an adult man and highlights the relationship between the boy and his mother with the use of powerful imagery.

“On the Night You Were Born” — Nancy Tillman

This book is meant to highlight you and everything you brought to the world. But it’s a good one for your child to hear too, since it’ll let them know what the world is about and what the world was like when they were born.

“Press Here” — Herve Tullet

There are no words in this book, only pictures for your baby to touch. Help your youngin’ learn the colors of the rainbow with this interactive book.

“Goodnight Moon” — Margaret Wise Brown

“Goodnight Moon” is another literary classic for youngsters. It tells the story of a bunny and his adventure saying goodnight to everything in his room. It’s a classic for all children, complete with vibrant imagery of a nighttime bedroom.

“First 100 Words” — Roger Priddy

Want your kid to learn some words quickly? This book may help you do that. It focuses on easy-to-learn words for children, told with colorful pictures that make it easy for young ones to understand.

“Baby Signs” — Joy Allen

This book may be more for parents than babies, but it’s certainly something babies can relate to. The book shows the different signs and gestures that children use, which can help parents understand what their child may be saying, even though they aren’t speaking.

“Where’s Spot?” — Eric Hill

Here’s another classic children’s book, which focuses on the story of a dog searching for another dog. The pictures inside are vibrant and catchy, and the story helps children understand what it means to care for something you’ve lost.

“Corduroy” — Don Freeman

“Corduroy” is yet another literary children’s classic, ranking as one of the top 100 picture books of all time, among other awards. It’s a simple story of a teddy bear waiting at a store, yearning for friendship.

“My Very First Mother Goose” — Iona Opie

Want your child to know the classic Mother Goose story and have a copy for the rest of their life? Opie’s version is the top choice for that since it tells the nursery rhyme in vivid detail.

“Are you my mother?” — P.D. Eastman

This book features a baby bird looking for his mother. It’s a classic tale to help your child understand the importance of family and how, possibly, to say the word “mother.”

The Snowy Day — Ezra Jack Keats

Get your child ready for all the excitement that comes with snow days with this 1976 classic.

“The Wheels on the Bus” — Paul O. Zelinsky

Want your child to know one of the greatest sing-a-longs ever? Read them this classic tale about a bus driving through the city. They’ll be wanting you to bring this book around and around again and again.

“Giraffes Can’t Dance” — Giles Andreae

This book is so popular that it’s sold out on Amazon. And it’s not surprising to see why. Its beautiful pictures tell the story of a giraffe who just wants to dance. It teaches children to follow their dreams and reach for success, even when the odds are stacked against them.

Email: hscribner@deseretdigital.com

Twitter: @herbscribner