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Now you can get dumped by an app, and the scary future of relationships

Breaking up has never been easier to do. With the help of a new app, your significant other can be dumped via text, Facebook post, tweet or prerecorded call from a Scottish man.

The app, Binder, has removed the complicated “it's not you, it’s me” talk and replaced it with a text, continuing the trend of using technology to automate and simplify relationships.

Ian Greenhill, co-creator of the app, said the app was created as a joke, but it reflects the trend in putting relationships online with apps like Tinder, according to Betsy Morais for The New Yorker.

READ MORE: Here's who breaks it off the most in relationships

“I think Tinder works so well because it’s quite shallow,” Greenhill told Morais. “It’s a simple thing. You know what you’re getting. And then you get to know the person better.”

Tinder, which connects you with other users in your area, has 50 million users and makes 12 million matches a day, Nick Bilton reported for The New York Times.

Unlike other dating services, Tinder focuses on photos rather than long-drawn-out profiles of people in your area. You can then either decide whether you would like to connect with them or not. If they would also like to connect with you, you can start a conversation.

“Research shows when people are evaluating photos of others, they are trying to access compatibility on not just a physical level, but a social level,” Tinder’s dating and relationship expert Jessica Carbino said. “They are trying to understand, ‘Do I have things in common with this person?’”

Photos cause 90 percent of the actions on dating sites, comedian Aziz Ansari wrote for Time.

This is basically the same as meeting people at the grocery store or a singles activity, but on a faster scale with a larger group of people at hand, Ansari wrote. It’s essentially what our ancestors did for many years on steroids.

“I think Tinder is a great thing,” anthropologist Helen Fisher told Time. “All Tinder is doing is giving you someone to look at that’s in the neighborhood. Then you let the human brain with his brilliant little algorithm tick, tick, tick off what you’re looking for.”

Not only can you start and end a relationship through an app, but you can keep it alive with one, too.

HeroBoyfriend, a new app not yet available to the public, gives its male users date ideas, calendar notifications of important relationship dates and advice on sweet talking their partner, according to Julia Carpenter of The Washington Post.

While dating sites have been common for many years, the romance part — building the relationship — was 100 percent up to the user.

Related links:

The 3 most important elements of a successful marriage

Your brain holds the secret to getting over a breakup

10 things you need to know about finding The One

Shelby Slade is a writer for Deseret News National. Email: sslade@deseretdigital.com, Twitter: shelbygslade.