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14 hilarious tweets you'll only see on Black Friday

Hunter Harvey, 2, helps his dad, C.J., wheel a big screen TV at Target on Black Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, in Wilmington, Mass. Stores open their doors Friday for what is still one of the busiest days of the year, even as the start of the holiday season edges
Hunter Harvey, 2, helps his dad, C.J., wheel a big screen TV at Target on Black Friday, Nov. 25, 2016, in Wilmington, Mass. Stores open their doors Friday for what is still one of the busiest days of the year, even as the start of the holiday season edges ever earlier. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Elise Amendola, AP

Another year, another Black Friday.

Starting early yesterday morning, Black Friday sales officially began across the nation (in addition to those that started on Thanksgiving). U.S. retailers said they experienced an overwhelming amount of shoppers on Thursday and Friday, which has forced them to expect higher sales than previous years, according to Reuters.

Shoppers, though, said this year’s Black Friday was tamer compared to years past.

"I've been here on other Black Fridays and it was bad, but I guess this year because of the hours it's not bad. Really calm," said shopper Lauren Green.

Of course, sales numbers may not mean all that much in the long run. As FiveThirtyEight’s Ben Casselman explained, Black Friday sales results don’t really explain the state of the economy. Numbers are generally unreliable and, in most cases, don’t reflect the state of holiday spending in general. Just because a number of people spend money over Thanksgiving weekend, it doesn’t mean we’re going to see high sales numbers during the rest of the holiday season.

Still, it’s an important time for retailers, Casselman wrote, as they aim to increase their numbers heading into the holiday with as many sales as possible.

But consumer spending habits are a little uneven. Black Friday spending is off the charts one year, but then lower the next. It fluctuates constantly, Casselman wrote.

“Perhaps in time, consumers’ behavior will settle into a fairly reliable pattern that’s easier to predict,” Casselman wrote. “For now, though, the only way to know how the holiday season will go is to wait and see.”

Shoppers were definitely out and about this Black Friday. To give you a sense of how they felt this year, we’ve rounded up some of the funniest and best tweets from Black Friday shoppers.

https://twitter.com/MatthewKick/status/802237517135282177

https://twitter.com/ozlifeadvice/status/802182452429160448https://twitter.com/JohnStamos/status/802182184320704512