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Here's what Utahns Googled the most in 2016

One look at what residents in each state Google most is like looking at a mosaic of 2016’s biggest pop culture events.
One look at what residents in each state Google most is like looking at a mosaic of 2016’s biggest pop culture events.
Screenshot, Estately

One look at what residents in each state Google most is like looking at a mosaic of 2016’s biggest pop culture events.

Estately, which offers information about buying and renting homes, worked with Google Trends to create a map of all 50 states along with their most Googled items from the year.

Utah’s most Google phrase was “Gilmore Girls,” likely a result of the show’s revival on Netflix earlier this year. Utahns also looked up a lot of movies, such as “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” “Zoolander 2,” “Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice,” “Captain America: Civil War,” “Alice Through the Looking Glass,” “Finding Dory” and “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.” Residents of the state also searched for the Netflix show “Stranger Things” and the activity of “glamping.”

You can read the entire calendar below. You can also find out more about your state at Estately.

One quick look around all of the states shows interesting trends about what issues and events people cared about most.

For example, Oklahomans searched for “Kevin Durant decision” more than any other state, likely because the prolific NBA star left the Oklahoma City Thunder earlier this summer.

In Florida, the top searched term was “Zika virus,” which makes sense given that Miami and southern Florida were hotbeds for the virus earlier this year.

Meanwhile, Idahoans asked “How did Trump win?” and Californians inquired, “2016 worst year ever?”

The list of events didn’t impress everyone, though. The Daily Dot, for example, pointed out that a handful of states searched for explanations on fake news stories and hoaxes, “like Alaska’s apparent interest in Pizzagate, a dangerous and blatantly false conspiracy theory that tied Hillary Clinton to sexual exploitation of children, and ‘Mr. T dead,’ a hoax that was especially popular in Tennessee.”

Twitter raised questions about North Dakota.

https://twitter.com/timdonnelly/status/811591095511613442?ref_src=twsrc%5EtfwMaybe 2017 will provide better results.

“Make of it what you will, and let’s hope 2017 offers much better things to occupy our internet searches,” Estately explained.