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Salt Lake tech workers experience least racism, survey says

Workers in Utah's booming tech industry experience less racism than every other major technology hub in the country. A survey by California-based Comparably showed that only 12 percent of employees in Salt Lake City said they have experienced racism.
Workers in Utah's booming tech industry experience less racism than every other major technology hub in the country. A survey by California-based Comparably showed that only 12 percent of employees in Salt Lake City said they have experienced racism.
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SALT LAKE CITY — Workers in Utah's booming tech industry experience less racism than every other major technology hub in the country.

A survey by California-based Comparably, an online platform that tracks employment data in the tech sector, showed that only 12 percent of employees in Salt Lake City said they have experienced racism in the workplace.

The cities with the highest rate of affirmative answers were the Texas metros of Austin, Dallas and Houston — each at 30 percent.

Of the top 15 markets in the survey, Salt Lake City had the lowest ranking.

Among the more than 2,000 respondents nationwide, nearly half of African-Americans and Latinos said they've experienced racism in the workplace — the most of all ethnicities and more than twice as likely as Asian Americans to have experienced discrimination.

"There's more work to be done in terms of gender and diversity pay gap and in some cases workplace culture, and we hope to do our small part in helping bridge the gaps for employees and companies," Comparably spokeswoman Jaime Sarachit said.

The data showed that tech industry as a whole could still do better in providing more diversity in the workplace and creating more inclusive environments for everyone, Sarachit said.

"This data allows the industry to take a deeper dive into what's happening in each of our cities and our companies," she said. "This kind of (information) is invaluable. The goal is to provide more transparency in the workplace (and) to help with employee happiness."

Sarachit noted that Salt Lake City's relatively low percentage of experienced bias reflects well on the culture that has been developed in Utah's burgeoning tech sector.

"Clearly, the companies are doing something right in Silicon Slopes. We as a society have to get better at having more transparent workplaces," she said. "We have to ask, 'What's it really like to work at an organization? Is the pay fair across gender and ethnicity lines?' The more (those things) can be accomplished, the more rewarding our workplaces will be."

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