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10 tweets to commemorate the anniversary of Pearl Harbor

In this June 6, 2013 photo provided by the USS Arizona Memorial Foundation, Lauren Bruner, one of five remaining survivors of the USS Arizona from the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor, is joined by Capt. Jeffry W. James, right, then the comma
In this June 6, 2013 photo provided by the USS Arizona Memorial Foundation, Lauren Bruner, one of five remaining survivors of the USS Arizona from the Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor, is joined by Capt. Jeffry W. James, right, then the commander of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, and Daniel Martinez, chief historian for the National Park Service, as they look at the Arizona Memorial's Shrine Wall with names of every man aboard the ship when it was attacked. More than 2,300 servicemen died in the Japanese attack that plunged the United States into World War II. Nearly half of those killed were on the Arizona, most still entombed in the wreckage.
Mark Comon, USS Arizona Memorial Foundation

President Franklin D. Roosevelt addressed Congress on Dec. 8, 1941, a day after the suprise attack at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

"Yesterday, December 7, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan," he said in his speech.

Today, we remember the attack, 75 years later.

According to History.com, the attack "lasted just two hours, but it was devastating: The Japanese managed to destroy nearly 20 American naval vessels, including eight enormous battleships, and more than 300 airplanes. More than 2,000 Americans soldiers and sailors died in the attack, and another 1,000 were wounded."

The next day, Roosevelt offically asked Congress to declare war.

"Congress approved his declaration with just one dissenting vote," History.com wrote. "Three days later, Japanese allies Germany and Italy also declared war on the United States, and again Congress reciprocated. More than two years into the conflict, America had finally joined World War II."

Pearl Harbor today is a popular tourist destination, according to pearlharborhistoricsites.org. It is the number one visitor destination in Hawaii, attracting more than 1.8 million visitors a year.

Daniel Martinez, the Park Service’s chief Pearl Harbor historian, told National Geographic that survivors and their families still visit the spot today to share their stories.

Here are 10 tweets that highlight how people have remembered the "day of infamy."

https://twitter.com/TheFoundingSon/status/806468020361109506
https://twitter.com/Babbsgirl2/status/806558713242861568