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Chris Hicks: Julianne Hough in ‘Grease Live!’ on DVD this week

The television version of “Grease,” a live production on Fox in January, is now on DVD.

“Grease Live!” (Paramount, 2016, featurettes). The latest incarnation of “Grease,” the musical-comedy spoof of 1950s mores — which was a Broadway hit in 1971 and a blockbuster movie in 1978 — again casts actors/singers in their 20s and 30s for the key roles, all playing teenagers. But hey, John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John weren’t exactly adolescents, either.

This production isn’t likely to replace your fond memories of the movie, but on its own terms, it’s an enjoyable, rousing romp with additional songs and clever staging (and that dubious denouement, which has always felt off). The logistics of moving around the sets and cameras is quite complex, but the staginess of the action and performances captures an energetic sense of the original Broadway show, especially when we see an audience in attendance.

Julianne Hough acquits herself nicely as Sandy and even gets to make a few jokes about her hometown, as the character is said to be from Salt Lake City. Aaron Tveit is acceptable as Danny, though someone with more charisma might have been welcome. And, as Rizzo, Vanessa Hudgens steals the show (which is dedicated to her late father, who died the night before the live performance). Carlos PenaVega, Carly Rae Jepsen, Keke Palmer and the rest are also good, and it’s nice to see Didi Conn as Vi, who runs the malt shop (she played Frenchy in the film version).

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Universal, 2015, two discs, 13 episodes). This loopy Netflix sitcom is created by Tina Fey and her “30 Rock” cohort Robert Carlock, and stars Ellie Kemper as the title character, who is a refugee from an end-of-the-world cult that kept her captive in an underground bunker for 15 years. Now she’s in Manhattan, trying to blend into the modern world.

Part culture-shock farce, part random non-sequitur silliness, the biggest boost this show gets is from the vivacious Kemper, whose cheerful energy is infectious, especially as she makes astonishing discoveries (“Look! My phone has a clock!”). Co-stars are Tituss Burgess, Carol Kane and Jane Krakowski, with guests Martin Short, Amy Sedaris, Christine Ebersole and, of course, Fey. (Season 2 debuts April 15.)

“Community: The Complete Sixth ‘Final?’ Season” (Sony, 2015, two discs, 13 episodes, deleted scenes, featurettes, bloopers). Joel McHale and the misfits of Greendale Community College get in one last season, thanks to Yahoo! Screen. Paget Brewster, Keith David, Martin Mull and Lesley Ann Warren have recurring roles, and guests include Nathan Fillion, Seth Green, Steve Guttenberg, Lisa Loeb, Billy Zane and Brooke Burns.

“Manhattan: Season Two” (Lionsgate, 2015, two discs, 10 episodes). Residents of Los Alamos, New Mexico, developing nuclear weapons toward the end of World War II, keep secrets from loved ones to devote their lives to ending the war. John Benjamin Hickey and Olivia Williams lead the ensemble cast, with William Petersen joining the show for this final season. Guests include Mamie Gummer, Griffin Dunne and Neve Campbell.

“When Calls the Heart: It Begins With Heart” (Shout!, 2016, two episodes). This two-part Season 3 premiere has Elizabeth (Erin Krakow) moving into her own row house, which upsets Jack (Daniel Lissing), as he’s been planning to build a new home for them. Jack Wagner and Lori Laughlin co-star in this Hallmark Channel series, set in 19th century frontier Canada and based on Janette Oke’s “Love Comes Softly” book series.

“Natural Born Hustlers” (PBS, 2016, three episodes). This three-part documentary miniseries reveals creatures in the wild that get ahead by surreptitious means, such as cuttlefish and squirrels that use illusion and tricks to elude predators.

“Lego Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu: Possession: Season Five” (Warner, 2015, two discs, 10 episodes). Inspired by Japanese and Chinese myths, this Lego animated series follows six ninjas in the world of Ninjago, which has a modern-day ambience.

“Yu-Gi-Oh!: GX: Season 3” (Flatiron, 2006-07, six discs, 52 episodes Anime spinoff/sequel to “Yu-Gi-Oh! Duel Monsters” follows young Jaden Yuki and his pals from Duel Academy as they take on multidimensional monsters.

“WordWorld: Planes, Trains and Trucks” (PBS, 2007-08, eight stories, word-learning exercises). Animated stories include “Duck’s Family Reunion,” “The Race to Mystery Island” and “Rocket to the Moon.”

“The Littlest Pet Shop: Pet Tales” (Shout! Kids, 2014-15, five episodes). Animated episodes include “Feud for Thought,” “Proud as a … Peacock?” and “What’s So Scary About the Jungle? Everything.”

“Peppa Pig: The Golden Boots” (eOne, 2011-12, 10 episodes). Animated episodes include “Kylie Kangaroo,” “Grampy Rabbit in Space” and the 15-minute special, “The Golden Boots.”

Chris Hicks is the author of "Has Hollywood Lost Its Mind? A Parent’s Guide to Movie Ratings." He also writes at www.hicksflicks.com and can be contacted at hicks@deseretnews.com.