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Trump decides to pull out of Paris Agreement. Here's a quick rundown of what that means

President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
Pablo Martinez Monsivais, AP

President Donald Trump announced Thursday afternoon that he plans to pull out of the Paris Agreement.

This agreement, led by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, looks to set a global action plan “to avoid dangerous climate change by limiting global warming to well below 2°C,” according to the agreement's website.

But Trump said he no longer plans to be a part of the agreement.

"So we're getting out, but we'll start to negotiate and we will see if we can make a deal that's fair," Trump said.

A White House memo released earlier Thursday further explained the president’s decision, according to The Washington Post.

“The Paris Accord is a BAD deal for Americans, and the president’s action today is keeping his campaign promise to put American workers first,” read a White House memo. “The Accord was negotiated poorly by the Obama administration and signed out of desperation.”

Here’s what that means for you and some other facts about this decision.

  • CNN political producer Dan Merica said sources told him that Trump will follow the four-year rule, meaning the U.S. won’t leave the agreement until Nov. 4, 2020. Election Day that year is Nov. 3.

  • For perspective, China committed to the climate deal on Thursday morning, BBC reported. The country’s premier, Li Keqiang, said China hopes other countries will follow it lead.

  • Trump pulling out of the deal means that one of the world’s superpower no longer looks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to The Hill. Nearly every country in the world, save for Nicaragua and Syria, have signed the Paris Agreement.
  • Exxon Mobil Corp, along with other major American businesses, have urged Trump to stay with the deal, The Hill reported.

  • Exxon CEO Darren Woods wrote in a May 9 letter to Trump: “By remaining a party to the Paris Agreement, the United States will maintain a seat at the negotiating table to ensure a level playing field so that all energy sources and technologies are treated equitably in an open, transparent and competitive global market.”

  • Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform, told The New York Times that Trump’s decision will play to his base.

  • Quote from Norquist: “Everybody who hates Trump wants him to stay in Paris. Everybody who respects him, trusts him, voted for him, wishes for him to succeed wants him to pull out.”

  • The United States’ decision to pull out of the agreement could also inspire other developing countries, like Brazil and India, to leave the agreement, Vox reported. Over time, the agreement’s list of countries could dwindle.

  • The New York Times has a Q&A that explains the climate deal in full and what it does. There's also some information about what that means for other nations, too.
  • The Boston Globe’s deputy Washington bureau chief tweeted a photo of former Secretary of State John Kerry signing the agreement.