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Jazz to offer local streaming option of games in 2017-18

Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder huddles with players as they trail the Golden State Warriors in the second half of game 2 of the NBA Western Conference Semifinals at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. on Thursday, May 04, 2017.
Utah Jazz head coach Quin Snyder huddles with players as they trail the Golden State Warriors in the second half of game 2 of the NBA Western Conference Semifinals at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. on Thursday, May 04, 2017.
Spenser Heaps,

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah Jazz fans won’t need to attend games in person or be in front of a TV to watch their favorite NBA team play next season.

In addition to being broadcast by ROOT Sports and occasionally by national channels, Jazz games will be streamed online and available to watch on devices and screens in and out of the Utah market beginning with the 2017-18 season, the Deseret News has confirmed.

This development, first reported by KSL.com's Andy Larsen, will give more Jazz fans the ability to watch games. Currently, people outside of the Utah media market were able to stream games online using the NBA League Pass, an annual service that costs about $200 per season.

However, people within Utah and some adjoining states were blacked out from viewing Jazz games on the League Pass because of NBA broadcasting rights regulations. The idea there was to encourage local Jazz fans to subscribe to a TV package, cable or satellite, that included ROOT Sports.

As KSL.com reported, DirecTV Now and PlayStation Vue are likely streaming partners for the Jazz.

Viewers don’t need to subscribe to DirecTV’s primary satellite service to be able to order its Now package. Both DirecTV Now and PlayStation Vue currently offer regional sports networks and various other channels. They have various apps available through Amazon, Android, Apple and Roku devices and traditional browsers.

The Jazz, whose $240 million contract with ROOT Sports runs through 2020-21, were one of three teams in the NBA that didn’t offer local streaming of their games, causing frustration among the franchise’s executives who’d hoped to offer that viewing alternative to fans, according to KSL.com.