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Utah votes for a Democrat in a presidential election of TV characters

In the last presidential election, Utahns voted for President Donald Trump over several other candidates, including Democrat Hillary Clinton. But would Utah swing blue?
In the last presidential election, Utahns voted for President Donald Trump over several other candidates, including Democrat Hillary Clinton. But would Utah swing blue?
Herb Scribner

In the last presidential election, Utahns voted for President Donald Trump over several other candidates, including Democrat Hillary Clinton, Libertarian Gary Johnson and independent candidate Evan McMullin.

But would Utah swing blue in a fictional election?

In conjunction with the return of “House of Cards,” Reviews.org recently reviewed Google Trends data to find out who would win in a fictional election between Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) on “House of Cards” and Fitzgerald Grant (Tony Goldwyn) of “Scandal.”

Based on the data, Utah swings blue.

“If this map was in real life, it would be shocking for the Democrats. They would lose the liberal strongholds like California, New York and Maryland, but somehow win the conservative heartlands of West Virginia, Utah and the Dakotas. Huh. That Fitz, winning over Olivia Pope and swarths of the American voters, even without the need for rigged machines in Ohio (a la season one),” according to Reviews.org.

But Fitzgerald would win the election with a 407-123 electoral vote, mostly because he snags some of the larger states like California, Texas, Florida and New York.

Even worse, Underwood lost his home state of Georgia, according to the report.

Utah’s chances of turning blue aren’t unrealistic. FiveThirtyEight editor-in-chief Nate Silver told the Deseret News that he’s long been fascinated with the Beehive State because its culture indicates the state should vote Democrat.

“In some ways, it increasingly has the markers of a blue state, meaning high education levels, big tech sector, young population. So you can kind of envision a world in eight years, 12 years, 16 years in which Utah behaves more like Colorado or something, right?” he told the Deseret News.

Silver said Utah’s voting habits may change, turning the state into something more purple than any other color.

“When you have a country that’s so polarized on the red and blue spectrum, I’m fascinated by anywhere that bucks that trend a little bit," he said.