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The Atlantic profiles Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake and his 'gamble' of decency

Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake takes a question from the audience during a town hall Thursday, April 13, 2017, in Mesa, Ariz. Flake is holding his first public event with constituents since January after coming under withering criticism for his voting
Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake takes a question from the audience during a town hall Thursday, April 13, 2017, in Mesa, Ariz. Flake is holding his first public event with constituents since January after coming under withering criticism for his voting record and avoiding such gatherings in recent months. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
Ross D. Franklin, AP

The Atlantic’s McKay Coppins recently wrote an extensive profile piece on Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, who’s currently stuck in a political crisis.

The article, called “Jeff Flake’s Gamble,” focuses on Flake’s recent call for a more decent America.

Flake, who is seeking re-election in 2018, has campaigned on the idea of decency, attending town hall meetings and public forums even though his advisors suggested he avoid such events.

“People here have legitimate concerns and are afraid,” Flake told The Atlantic.

More so, Flake has been engaging in a polite political debate.

“Flake seems as if he has just landed in a time machine from some bygone era of polite disagreement,” The Atlantic reported.

Note: The article contains mild language.

Read more about Flake’s political battle at The Atlantic.

Multiple reports from the last few months have shined a spotlight on Flake’s re-election run since the BYU grad spoke out against President Donald Trump.

According to The Hill, Flake called Trump’s initial travel ban “unacceptable.”

So much so that Trump mulled over the idea of spending $10 million in support of one of Flake’s opponents in the 2018 race, according to the Deseret News.

Flake, though, told The Washington Post that he embraces the forthcoming challenge.

“If I wanted an easier path through the primary, then I would line up more with where the president is,” he said. “But I think if you’re an elected official, you’ve got to do what you know what’s right. It’ll be a tougher path than I could have had, would have had, but I think I’ll get there.”