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You might see a self-driving semitruck on your way to Las Vegas

Elon Musk unveiled a potential self-driving semi-truck.
Elon Musk unveiled a potential self-driving semi-truck.
Screenshot, Twitter

Soon you might see self-driving semis on the road to Las Vegas.

Reuters exclusively reported on Wednesday that Tesla is currently developing a self-driving semitruck, which the solar and tech company hopes to test out on Nevada roads.

Tesla has already spoken with the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles about testing the vehicle.

Reuters reported on two emails between Tesla and the Nevada DMV that spoke about this potential vehicle.

"To insure we are on the same page, our primary goal is the ability to operate our prototype test trucks in a continuous manner across the state line and within the states of Nevada and California in a platooning and/or Autonomous mode without having a person in the vehicle," Tesla regulatory official Nasser Zamani wrote to Nevada DMV official April Sanborn, according to Reuters.

Self-driving trucks haven’t been tested on Nevada roads yet.

Silicon Valley companies have investigated how to build long-haul trucks that have self-drive technology, too, according to Reuters.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said during a TED Talk earlier this year that he hopes to unveil the semitruck in September.

https://twitter.com/JMBooyah/status/858023078818971648Self-driving cars, though, have been tested on California roads. Right now there’s an ongoing debate about the necessity and success of self-driving cars, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Some see the cars as potentially dangerous since there’s no human behind the while. Others believe the cars won’t be as dangerous, since cars can’t become intoxicated.

"We have good reason to believe that autonomous vehicles will be safer — they're never drunk or tired or distracted," Nidhi Kalra, of Rand Corp., told the L.A. Times. "What we don't know is what kinds of errors they may introduce. Where humans fail the most may not be where autonomous vehicles do. They may fail in entirely new ways."