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Here's what people are saying in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville

In this Aug. 13, 2107 photo, mourners listen to speakers in Savannah, Ga., at Savannah Taking Action for Resistance's candlelight vigil for the victims in Charlottesville, Va. The vigil took place a day after a white supremacist rally spiraled into deadly
In this Aug. 13, 2107 photo, mourners listen to speakers in Savannah, Ga., at Savannah Taking Action for Resistance's candlelight vigil for the victims in Charlottesville, Va. The vigil took place a day after a white supremacist rally spiraled into deadly violence in Charlottesville. (Will Peebles/Savannah Morning News via AP)
Will Peebles, Savannah Morning News

Violence and unrest erupted over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, where there was a rally of white nationalists with counterprotesters nearby.

The events turned deadline when a man drove a Dodge Challenger into a crowd, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

A pair of police officers, Lt. H. Jay Cullen, 48, and Trooper Berke M.M. Bates, also died during the rally in a helicopter crash while monitoring the situation on the ground, CNN reported.

In the aftermath, Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe called for all right-wing groups to leave the area, CNN reported.

"Go home. ... You are not wanted in this great commonwealth. Shame on you."

The events have inspired a number of reactions since it occurred. Here’s a quick breakdown of what’s being said.

  • President Donald Trump responded to the events on Saturday, saying the country is divide and there’s a lot of trouble on “many sides.
  • Trump also shared his thoughts on Twitter.

  • Trump condemned racism on Monday, too.

Officials have raised questions about Trump not condemning white supremacists, according to BuzzFeed News. Several senators, including Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch, said Trump and America should speak out against Nazis and white supremacists.

  • Vice President Mike Pence spoke out against the media for criticizing Trump over his remarks about the victims, Politico reported. "We should be putting the attention where it belongs, and that is on those extremist groups that need to be pushed out of the public debate entirely and discredited for the hate groups and dangerous fringe groups that they are."
  • Utah lawmakers also quickly responded to the chaos, calling for the country to unite rather than divide itself farther apart, according to the Deseret News.
  • Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said from his Twitter account: "Bigotry and racism have no place in our society. We condemn such acts in the strongest terms.”

BuzzFeed News shared more information about the victims of the incidents.

James Alex Fields Jr., 20, of Maumee, Ohio, is accused of running down one person in his car during the protests on Saturday, according to CNN. He was set to appear in court on Monday.

  • One of Fields' former teachers, Derek Weimer, who teaches social studies at Randall K. Cooper High Schoolat the high school he attended in Union, Kentucky, told CNN that Fields always had radical beliefs.

Weimer quote on CNN: "It was quite clear he had some really extreme views and maybe a little bit of anger behind them. Feeling, what's the word I'm looking for, oppressed or persecuted. He really bought into this white supremacist thing. He was very big into Nazism. He really had a fondness for Adolf Hitler."

  • Fields’ mother, Samantha Bloom, told the Toledo Blade she didn’t talk with her son about politics. She also said she had no idea he would be at a white nationalist rally.
  • Cities across the United States held vigils on Sunday in wake of the events, according to ABC News.
  • Attendees of these vigils shared photos on social media of what the events looked like.

Mashable’s Kelly Kline wrote that people shouldn’t ignore what happened in Charlottesville. She said the event should serve as “a jarring reminder that racism is alive and well in this country, and that hate of any caliber should never be tolerated.

  • The Atlantic’s Emma Green brought up the question of how churches will deal with the aftermath of Charlottesville. She wrote that religious groups have struggled to deal with racism, even when it happens inside their own communities.
  • After the events, FiveThirtyEight shared data and graphics about the rise of white identity politics. One interesting note from the piece said that “America doesn’t need a White Lives Matter movement because it already values white lives.”