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Pregnant wife saves husband by performing CPR the day before she gave birth

In this Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018, photo Andrew Goette and his wife, Ashley, look at their baby, Lennon, at United Hospital in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Andrew awoke from a medically-induced coma just in time for the birth of Lennon after his wife, 39 weeks pre
In this Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018, photo Andrew Goette and his wife, Ashley, look at their baby, Lennon, at United Hospital in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Andrew awoke from a medically-induced coma just in time for the birth of Lennon after his wife, 39 weeks pregnant, saved him from cardiac arrest.
Jiwon Choi, Minnesota Public Radio

SALT LAKE CITY — On Oct. 16, Ashley Goette of West Saint Paul, Minnesota woke up in the middle of the night to the sound of her husband, Andrew, gasping for air. She immediately called 911.

Ashley didn’t know it at the time, but Andrew was going into cardiac arrest.

According to The Washington Post, Goette was told that she would need to give her husband CPR. The only problem? She was 39 weeks pregnant and scheduled to be induced the next day.

“I can’t do this,” Goette told the emergency dispatcher. But she continued to perform chest compressions until paramedics arrived.

ABC News reported that the doctors were worried that lack of oxygen to Andrew’s brain had caused extensive brain damage, they put him in a medically induced coma in an effort to prevent further damage.

"I didn’t want to have to think for one second about having to do any of this without him,” Goette said according to Fox affiliate KMSP. “I kept telling him the whole time he was asleep, or in his coma, that I was not going to have this baby until he woke up.”

Goette made good on her word. Andrew woke up on Oct. 17, miraculously having no noticeable complications from the cardiac arrest. The baby was born the next day.

"I was just so excited to be able to see him be born," he said, according to CBS News. "To be able to hold him right away, first actually."

Andrew’s cardiac arrest was caused by a condition called Wolff-Parkinson White syndrome. ABC News reported that doctors corrected the condition, saying that his prognosis is “fantastic.”

Dr. Alex Teeters, a pulmonary and critical care physician at United Hospital credited Andrew’s survival to Ashley’s quick response.

“I don’t think Andrew would be here today if it wasn’t for the actions of Ashley.”