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These videos show 'curtain of fire' volcanic eruption in Hawaii

This photo provided by Shane Turpin shows results of the eruption from Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island Friday, May 4, 2018. The eruption sent molten lava through forests and bubbling up from paved streets and forced the evacuation of about 1,500 pe
This photo provided by Shane Turpin shows results of the eruption from Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island Friday, May 4, 2018. The eruption sent molten lava through forests and bubbling up from paved streets and forced the evacuation of about 1,500 people who were still out of their homes Friday after Thursday's eruption. (Shane Turpin/seeLava.com via AP)
Shane Turpin

About 1,500 residents of communities on the Big Island of Hawaii fled their homes after the Kilauea volcano began to spew lava, according to the Associated Press.

About 100 people remain in shelters Friday. There have been no reports of injuries or deaths. Hawaii Gov. David Ige activated the National Guard to help with evacuations, which left more than 700 structures empty.

Authorities detected a high amount of sulfur gas in the air, which they said could threaten the elderly and those with breathing issues.

The eruption began late Wednesday as molten lava broke through the forests and spewed out on several main streets.

Hawaiian residents were first warned of a potential volcano eruption when several earthquakes erupted in the area throughout the last week, according to the Deseret News.

Videos of the “curtain of fire” began to circulate online Friday morning.

The Kilauea volcano is the most active volcano in Hawaii, according to Hawaii News Now. It erupted because the Puu Oo crater collapsed underneath the volcano’s rift zone.

"The seismicity on the lower east rift zone had declined and the tilt had slowed down, so that indicates that the intrusion has stalled or paused," said Janet Babb, a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist. "What we don't know is if this intrusive event is over or if it's just taking a pause and it may pick back up."

According to the New York Post, Babb said that the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has seen similar activity in the past, which led them to believe that the volcano would erupt again.