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Friends, clients mourn Utah veterinarian killed in New Mexico shooting

Cody Wrathall
Cody Wrathall
Facebook.com

SALT LAKE CITY — New Mexico police are still investigating the shooting of a Utah veterinarian Saturday at an Albuquerque brewery.

Cody Guy Wrathall, 43, allegedly followed a woman into the brewery and brandished a gun before he was shot and killed by an off-duty FBI agent, the Albuquerque Journal reported.

Police told reporters that before the shooting a woman had called 911 and told dispatchers she was in Nexus Brewery and was being stalked by her ex-boyfriend, according to the Journal.

Additional information was not released while the shooting remains under investigation, police said.

But friends, family members and clients took to social media to mourn the veterinarian who worked with horses in Saratoga Springs.

"Something does not sound right here. The man I knew was gentle and kind and took great care of our alpacas when he practiced in Utah County," one woman wrote.

"Missing my brother. The world lost a great man this last weekend. Although it wasn’t as often as it should have been … I am going to miss the time we spent together. Love you Cody Wrathall," a man said.

"My heart aches to hear this news. You were one of the best, and everyone knows the standard I have for veterinarians! I will forever be grateful for your kindness and compassion the day you had to put Floyd (De Great) down for me. You made one of the toughest days of my life a little more bearable. My deepest sympathies and prayers to your kids and loved ones. The world lost a great man!" another client wrote.

Wrathall has no criminal history in Utah, court records show.

In September 2018, Wrathall was reprimanded by the Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing for an incident in which he allegedly "blacked out after ingesting the controlled substances ketamine and Valium" that he had gotten from a former veterinarian practice.

"(Wrathall) had attempted to treat himself for depression and anxiety," according to a division document.

His veterinarian license remained active.