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Grasshopper hordes are descending on Las Vegas. See the photos and videos

CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said the hordes of grasshoppers make it look like there are multiple storms hovering over Las Vegas. That's not the case.

This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows a grasshopper on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago.
This Thursday, July 25, 2019, photo shows a grasshopper on a sidewalk outside the Las Vegas Sun offices in Henderson, Nev. A migration of mild-mannered grasshoppers sweeping through the Las Vegas area is being attributed to wet weather several months ago.
Steve Marcus, Las Vegas Sun

SALT LAKE CITY — Hordes of grasshoppers have popped up in Las Vegas. And according to CNN, there are so many that they’re showing up on weather radar.

CNN meteorologist Allison Chinchar said the hordes of grasshoppers make it look like there are multiple storms hovering over Las Vegas. She noticed one of the storms wasn’t moving like a normal storm.

“It looked as though it should be torrentially downpouring in Las Vegas,” Chinchar said.

When she dug deeper into the storms, she found one of them wasn’t a storm at all — it was a horde of grasshoppers hovering over Las Vegas.

The National Weather Service in Las Vegas took note of the hordes.

“Some of you have been asking about the widespread radar returns the past few nights in #Vegas. Radar analysis suggests most of these echoes are biological targets. This typically includes birds, bats, and bugs, and most likely in our case--> Grasshoppers,” the office wrote in a Twitter post.

Think that’s freaky? Check out these social media posts.

Why?: Per The Huffington Post, higher-than-average rainfall can lead to mass migration from insects. Las Vegas experienced a wetter spring than usual.

Next up: Experts don’t see this slowing down. More insects, including grasshoppers, could flood the area over the next few weeks until the desert dries up, according to The New York Times.

Don’t worry: Jeff Lockwood, a professor of natural sciences and humanities at the University of Wyoming, said you shouldn’t worry about the insects, according to The New York Times.

  • “We can probably blame the Book of Exodus,” he said. “I think that kind of planted a seed in Western culture and Western mindset of these outbreaks sort of being dark and dangerous.”