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Northern lights: Here’s where you can see them over Labor Day weekend

People across the country will have a chance to see the aurora and the northern lights this weekend thanks to some geomagnetic activity.

The northern lights shine over West Grand Traverse Bay near Traverse City, Mich., on Monday night, Oct. 24 2011. The lights, also known as aurora borealis in the northern hemisphere, are caused by charged particles striking the Earth’s atmostphere. Record-Eagle, Jan-Michael Stump, Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — You may have a chance to see the northern lights this weekend.

People across the country will have a chance to view the aurora and the northern lights this weekend thanks to some geomagnetic activity, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

So let’s skip right to the good part — how do you see them? Well, your location a matters a lot.

“In general, you are more likely to see an aurora if you are at a high latitude, i.e. closer to the north (or south) pole,” according to NOAA.

Here is a list of the cities where you should be able to see the aurora in North America:

  • Atlanta
  • Boston
  • Chicago
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Great Falls, Montana
  • Havana
  • Los Angeles
  • Mexico City
  • Minneapolis
  • New York
  • Quebec City
  • San Francisco
  • Seattle
  • St. Louis
  • Toronto
  • Washington, D.C.
  • Winnipeg

That said, the NOAA told the Deseret News in an email that people who live within the green and yellow lines in the map below have the best opportunity.

“But given the inherent uncertainty, the green line is where visibility is possible with higher confidence,” the NOAA said in its email.

Courtesy NOAA