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Indonesia’s sky turns blood red, freaking out social media

‘This is not Mars. This is Jambi.’

Indonesia’s skies turn blood red.
Indonesia’s skies turn blood red.
Screenshot, @doglab

The Indonesian province of Jambi saw its skies turn blood red over the weekend, leading to a deep red faze to filter the area.

What happened: Forest fires in the area created a smoky haze that covered the entire region in a reddish haze and glow.

How it happened: A meteorology expert called the event a “Rayleigh scattering,” which is when light scatters by particles. It’s one reason why the sky is normally a blue color since blue light scatters easier than red, according to the BBC News.

“In the smoke haze, the most abundant particles are around 1 micrometre in size, but these particles do not change the colour of the light we see,” professor Koh Tieh Yong, of the Singapore University of Social Sciences, told BBC News.

“In the smoke haze, the most abundant particles are around 1 micrometre in size, but these particles do not change the colour of the light we see,” he told the BBC.

”There are also smaller particles, around 0.05 micrometres or less, that don’t make up a lot of the haze but are still somewhat more abundant during a haze period (than a normal non-haze period) ... but this is enough to give an extra tendency to scatter red light more in the forward and backward directions than blue light — and that is why would you see more red than blue.”

“If the sun is overhead and you look up, (you will be looking) in the line of the sun, so it would appear that more of the sky is red.”

Reaction: Residents in the area remarked at the horror-film sky.

“This is not Mars. This is Jambi,” said user Zuni Shofi Yatun Nisa. “We humans need clean air, not smoke.”

Photos and videos surfaced online, too.