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Minneapolis voters have rejected replacing police with a new agency. What’s next?

Minneapolis voters Tuesday rejected a proposal to replace the city’s police department. Here’s what that means.

Steven Jones rides the elevator with an “I Voted” sticker on his face mask.
Steven Jones rides the elevator with an “I Voted” sticker on his face mask, Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2021, at the Parker Skyview assisted living facility in northeast Minneapolis.
Associated Press

Minneapolis voters decided Tuesday to reject a measure to revamp its police department, The Associated Press reports.

  • The proposal would have replaced the police department with a new Department of Public Safety, which would have brought about police reform as a reaction to the death of George Floyd.

What was the Minneapolis police bill about?

Per The Associated Press, the city’s initiative would have changed the city charter to remove the city’s requirement of a police department with a certain number of officers.

  • The ballot question would have created a new Department of Public Safety, which would take “a comprehensive public health approach to the delivery of functions,” according to The Associated Press.

Why did people oppose the Minneapolis police bill?

Opponents of the measure said there was no concrete replacement plan on what to do if it was approved.

  • And it would leave some areas of the city vulnerable to crime, opponents said.

Why did people support the Minneapolis police bill?

But JaNaé Bates, a Black minister and leader of the coalition group Yes 4 Minneapolis, said the bill would have offered more flexibility for the city, according to The Washington Post.

  • “We’re still going to have police,” she said before the vote. “What this does is give the city more flexibility in how we approach safety.”

What’s next for Minneapolis and police?

Miski Noor, an organizer with Black Visions, a grassroots organization, told HuffPost that more action is still needed to improve police relations with people in the city.

  • “Abolishing a system that murders Black people indiscriminately is what is eventually necessary and what we are hopefully moving towards,” Noor said. “The steps we are getting now is what it means to respond to violence. These are the interventions we need to support people. Folks hear ‘abolish,’ but they think it is about destruction. But it really is about building up.”