France is implementing a project that will subsidize clothing and shoe repairs to help reduce waste and challenge fast fashion in the country.

In France, about 700,000 tons of clothing is thrown away each year, two-thirds of which ends up in landfills, The Guardian said.

CNN said the country’s new project offers “discounts varying from 6 euros ($7) to 25 euros ($28)” for clothing and shoe repairs, depending on the complexity of the repair, announced Tuesday by the secretary of state for ecology, Bérangère Couillard.

Per CNN, Couillard said that the new system could “encourage exactly the people who have bought, for example, shoes from a brand that makes good-quality shoes or likewise good-quality ready-to-wear to want to have them fixed instead of getting rid of them.”

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Refashion

Refashion is the group that has been asked to set up the new project, according to the BBC.

The company website said, “We ensure the prevention and the management of the end of life of clothing textiles, household linen and shoes put on the French market by supporting the collection, the repair and the re-use.”

It added, “We help brands to engage in an eco-design approach and support downstream actors to develop the recycling industry in France.”

Couillard encourages all those who can sew or make shoes in the country to join, which would support the repair sector and create new jobs, BBC said.

The Guardian reported that Couillard said the company will start in October, with the repair bonus funded with 154 million euros (about $173 million) that the government has set aside for the next five years.

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Helping the planet

With the French textile industry set to account for about 25% of global greenhouse emissions by 2050, Couillard said the objective of Refashion is to “create a circular economy for shoes and textiles so that products last longer, because in government, we believe in the second life of a product,” per CNN.

BBC said the French will also implement new clothing labeling rules starting in 2024 that will have companies state the environmental impact of an item, like the amount of water used to make the item, the risk of microplastic emissions or the use of chemicals for the making of the item.

Companies must also state on the item in which country it was produced and the material it’s made of, per The Guardian.