Facebook Twitter

Here’s how many COVID-19 deaths could have been prevented by the vaccine

The coronavirus vaccine could have saved people’s lives, especially since it is widely available, according to recent analysis

SHARE Here’s how many COVID-19 deaths could have been prevented by the vaccine
A photo of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is drawn into a syringe.

A Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is drawn into a syringe in Utah. Close to 90,000 American lives could have been saved through COVID-19 vaccinations, according to a new analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Laura Seitz, Deseret News

Close to 90,000 American lives could have been saved through COVID-19 vaccinations, according to a new analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

  • The analysis found that most of the preventable deaths happened within the last month when the COVID-19 vaccine has been widely available.

According to the analysis, COVID-19 was the second-leading cause of death throughout the month of September. There were about 1,899 daily deaths due to COVID-19 in the United States on average throughout the month, trailing only heart disease, which had 2,078 deaths per day on average.

  • COVID-19 deaths continue to decline. But there have been more than 1,600 deaths per day from COVID-19 in the first week of October, despite the vaccine being widely available to people, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

In August, a forecasting model from the University of Washington suggested that there would be close to 100,000 deaths from the novel coronavirus by December, per The Associated Press.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CNN that those deaths could be prevented with help of the vaccine.

  • “What is going on now is both entirely predictable, but entirely preventable,” Fauci told CNN. “We know we have the wherewithal with vaccines to turn this around.”