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CDC reveals how many people in the U.S. have gotten booster shots already

Here’s how many people have received COVID-19 booster shots already

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine vials at Weber State University in Ogden.
Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine vials sit on a table at a vaccination clinic at the Shepherd Union Atrium at Weber State University in Ogden on Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021. Close to 1 million COVID-19 booster shots have been administered in the U.S., according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Scott G Winterton, Deseret News

Close to 1 million COVID-19 booster shots have been administered in the U.S., according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

How many people got COVID-19 booster shots?

Per CNBC, about 955,000 fully vaccinated people received another dose of the COVID-19 vaccines.

  • Those fully vaccinated people previously received either two shots of Pfizer or Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines or one dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine.
  • “It’s unclear if all of those people were considered immunocompromised,” according to CNBC.

Who qualifies for a COVID-19 booster shot now?

Per The Washington Post, the third shot is available for immunocompromised people. People will need a doctor’s note to receive the vaccine shot right now.

Should you get a COVID-19 booster shot?

Some experts are worried about giving out the COVID-19 booster shots too soon, though. Experts told Kaiser Health News that there is little known about the side effects of a third shot.

And experts recently told The New York Times that some people might not need the third shot yet, since the COVID-19 vaccines are stopping hospitalizations so far. For example, Dr. Céline Gounder, an infectious disease specialist at Bellevue Hospital Center, told The New York Times that the COVID-19 vaccine boosters are only needed if the vaccines weren’t stopping severe illness.

  • “Feeling sick like a dog and laid up in bed, but not in the hospital with severe COVID, is not a good enough reason,” Gounder told The New York Times. “We’ll be better protected by vaccinating the unvaccinated here and around the world.”