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Doctor reveals the easiest way for us to get back to normal

Sick of the COVID-19 pandemic? An expert has advice on how to return to normal

Ryan Jensen gives Utah Valley University instructor Lauren Brooks a COVID-19 test.
Ryan Jensen gives Utah Valley University instructor Lauren Brooks a COVID-19 test at the university in Orem on Thursday, Aug. 26, 2021. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said COVID-19 vaccines are the key to stopping the pandemic from stretching even longer.
Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

The coronavirus pandemic continues to roll on throughout the world. Though some have found a return to normal, that’s not the case for everyone.

Dr. Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Hospital, told CNN that there are plenty of people who have not returned to normal because they’re not set up socially or economically to do so.

  • “We’re in the same storm, but we’re not in the same boat. Some of us are in yachts. We have resources. We can work from home, we’re immune-competent, we have access to a vaccine — and some of us are in rafts,” Christakis said.

However, despite our differences, everyone has to same opportunity to help the world return to normal.

  • “All of us need to do all we can do to help those in less sturdy crafts, and that means getting vaccinated as soon as you can and masking up according to the CDC guidelines,” he said.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, recently said that vaccinations are key to stopping another 100,000 deaths from happening. He said on the “Today” show that COVID-19 vaccines are the key to stopping the pandemic from stretching even longer.

  • “If we do it right and get through the winter, I hope as we get to the spring of 2022, we’ll get there,” he said on the “Today” show.

Since earlier this summer, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said there is hope for the U.S. to avoid a spike in the fall by doubling down on vaccination efforts, too.

  • “I think now is our moment to really double down on our vaccination efforts and our other prevention interventions,” she said on “Good Morning America.”
  • “We still have to send the same messages as we did last year,” Walensky said.