Elizabeth Smart

News and information about activist and philanthropist Elizabeth Smart, who is a child abduction and sexual violence survivor

Utah Gov. Spencer Cox on Tuesday nominated the Utah Court of Appeals judge to replace Justice Deno Himonas on the Utah Supreme Court. Her nomination requires a vote by Utah lawmakers.
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The Deseret News and Hinckley Institute of Politics asked Utahns — regardless of their personal political affiliation — which one of the two they most identify with.
Some rooms inside select Latter-day Saint temples will now be convertible, creating the flexibility to meet the needs of the members attending on a given day.
Quarterback Gary Sheide opens up about playing for LaVell Edwards, his decision to commit to the Cougars, and how that decision changed his life.
Updates from the tragic mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, which took the lives of 19 students and two teachers.
From Columbine to Robb Elementary, the list of mass murders, many at schools, seems endless. America must set aside political differences and confront this national defect head on.
The organizations’ combined resources will be used to create awareness about how to recognize and combat sexual violence and exploitation.
Elizabeth Smart appeared on ‘Red Table Talk’ to speak about the Gabby Petito case.
Survivors and Utah’s congressional delegates discussed what can be done to fight human trafficking during the Human Trafficking Policy and Education Summit at the Malouf Foundation in Logan.
“I thought, ‘I live a pretty serious life, and I’m going to take this opportunity and just have fun,’” Smart told the show’s host.
She launches new defense program after feeling disappointed she didn’t do more
‘I thought Elizabeth’s ordeal was very difficult, but this one is more difficult,’ he said
The country can use more Elizabeth Smarts — an unwavering understanding that present circumstances don’t need to determine the future.
Early in the morning of June 5, 2002, Brian David Mitchell cut through a window screen, broke into Edward and Lois Smart’s home, and forced 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart from her home in Federal Heights to a camp in the woods on the outskirts of Salt
“Where does your hope and resilience come from?” This question served as the catalyst for Elizabeth Smart’s most recent book, “Where There’s Hope: Healing, Moving Forward and Never Giving Up.”
Separated at last from the man who had held her captive, continuously raped her and threatened to kill her for the past nine months, Elizabeth Smart still did not have the courage to tell the police officers that had just handcuffed her and put her into the back of a patrol car who she really was.