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Nintendo files two lawsuits against hackers. Here’s why

Nintendo was hacked. So lawsuits were filed

In this Jan. 23, 2020, photo, a Nintendo sign is seen at the company’s official store in the Shibuya district of Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020.
In this Jan. 23, 2020, photo, a Nintendo sign is seen at the company’s official store in the Shibuya district of Tokyo, Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020.
Associated Press

Nintendo of America filed two lawsuits against a group of hackers who sell the Switch software so that people can play pirated games, Polygon reports.

What’s the news:

  • Nintendo has filed two lawsuits — one against UberChips and another against an anonymous group of websites — on Friday.
  • The Nintendo lawyers said the defendants sell products from a group called “Team Xecuter.” The lawyers said the sold products are “an unauthorized operating system ... and accompanying piracy tools that install it.”
  • The lawyers said these products help users evade Nintendo’s security measures, which often stop people from creating unauthorized and pirates copies of games, according to Polygon.
  • Players can download the unauthorized operating system to begin playing those pirates games.
  • The kits are available online on websites listed in the lawsuit. According to Polygon, the kits costs $47.99.

A history of lawsuits

  • Back in 2018, Nintendo filed a lawsuit against Team Xecutor.
  • The company won an injunction against the game pirate Sergio Mojarro Moreno, too. He was told to stop reselling the hacks, according to Dot Esports.
  • Nintendo also filed a lawsuit in September 2019 against RomUniverse, which creates ROM pirated Nintendo games. The company also reached a $12 million settlement against LoveROMS.com and LoveRETRO.co — which create those ROM games, too.
  • “Nintendo is also known to send out cease-and-desist letters liberally, issuing a takedown notice for 562 fan games in 2016,” according to Dot Esports. “But the company doesn’t only focus on protecting the intellectual property limited to physical units or unauthorized game downloads. It has previously cracked down on copyright claims on YouTube channels for receiving monetization while playing its games or music.”