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India has banned TikTok because of a deadly military conflict

The Indian government has banned TikTok because it reportedly threatens “sovereignty.”

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This Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. From the perspective of teens flooding onto TikTok, the Chinese-owned online video app is a major new outlet for self-expression, one proudly home to the silly, the loud and the weird. To others, though, the service is an unnerving black box that could be sharing information with the Chinese government, facilitating espionage, or just promoting videos and songs some parents consider lewd. (AP Photo)

This Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020, photo shows the icon for TikTok taken in New York. From the perspective of teens flooding onto TikTok, the Chinese-owned online video app is a major new outlet for self-expression, one proudly home to the silly, the loud and the weird.

Associated Press

Indiahas reportedly banned TikTok— the popular social media video app — from the country, alleging that the app violates privacy law and threatens “sovereignty.”

What’s happening:

  • India announced Monday it would ban 59 apps from the country, including TikTok.
  • These apps were banned for taking part “in activities which is prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, security of state and public order.”
  • TikTok — which is owned by ByteDance, a Chinese company — has faced accusations over privacy policies in the past.
  • The ban comes at a moment of darkness between India and China, too.
  • Mashable said: “While there are privacy-related reasons to be concerned about TikTok, and many other apps for that matter, this latest ban follows on the heels of a deadly border clash between Indian and Chinese military forces earlier this month that left 20 Indian soldiers dead.”

Why this matters

  • TikTok has tried to become a popular app throughout the world, bringing people closer together in the process.
  • But “China’s worsening diplomatic relations around the globe. It is yet another sign that the digital world, once thought of as a unifying space that transcended old divisions, is being carved up along the same national lines that split the physical one,” according to The New York Times.