In 1950, Charles Lindbergh was 48 years old, lived with his family in Fairfield, Connecticut, and listed his profession as government aviation consultant.

Walt Disney was also 48, resided in Los Angles, California, and indicated that he was the president of a “motion picture cartoon studio.”

Rosa Parks, 37, lived with her husband in Montgomery, Alabama. She did not list a profession, but her husband Raymond worked in a barbershop.

The trio of notable names, along with personal details about their lives in post-World War II America, are among millions whose records are now available with the release of the 1950 U.S. census.

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“There are people that people think they already now, and it’s interesting to see aspects that you may not now,” said Jim Ericson, a senior manager at FamilySearch. “It’s fun to see these people and realize that everybody could be learning about their own family.”

Is the 1950 U.S. census available online?

Since its release on April 1, more than 50% of the 151 million names in the 1950 U.S. census have been reviewed as part of an effort to create a searchable digital database of the records.

The records for two states — Utah and Nevada — have been completed. Idaho is 90% reviewed and several other states are nearing completion, according to Janelle Vasquez, a program manager at FamilySearch.

An interactive map on FamilySearch shows the progress of each state.

An interactive map on FamilySearch displays the progress of each state in the process of creating a searchable index of the 1950 U.S. Census.
An interactive map on FamilySearch displays the progress of each state in the process of creating a searchable index of the 1950 U.S. census. | FamilySearch.org

The 1950 U.S. census project has been supported by more than 130,000 volunteers, but FamilySearch is asking for more help in two areas.

How to help create searchable index

First, there are still millions of names to review. Patrons can use the Get Involved app or FamilySearch website to verify names for the index.

“We are 60% done reviewing all names in the United States, which means we have reviewed 75 million names so far, “Ericson said.

The second task is to review families, which means verifying details listed for each person in a family or household.

Initially, this task was more complicated, but FamilySearch has collaborated with Ancestry to simplify and take less time.

“We have simplified the process of reviewing the records and made it much easier on the volunteers,” Ericson said. “We are eager to make the records freely available.”

A U.S. Census enumerator speaks with a family in Virginia during the 1950 census.
A U.S. census enumerator speaks with a family in Virginia during the 1950 census. | United States Census Bureau

See more famous names in 1950 U.S. census

Here is a list of other 24 recognizable names found in the 1950 U.S. census and where they were living when enumerated in 1950. The records can be viewed for free with a FamilySearch account.

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Celebrities, entertainers and notable names:

First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints:

More famous people found in the 1950 U.S. census, including Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Muhammad Ali, Bob Ross, John Denver, John Belushi and others are listed in this article published by Census.gov.

Learn more about the 1950 U.S. census project at FamilySearch.org or Ancestry.com.

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