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Letter: The Electoral College doesn’t ensure equal representation. It prevents it

SHARE Letter: The Electoral College doesn’t ensure equal representation. It prevents it
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Protesters hold signs outside the Capitol before Electoral College electors begin voting, Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, in Olympia, Wash.

Elaine Thompson, Associated Press

There’s no convincing argument to make the vote of one person more impactful than another simply because they live in different states.

For example, compare California, with a population of 39.5 million and 55 electoral votes, to North Dakota, with a population of 803,000 and three electoral votes. North Dakota gets one electoral vote for every 268,000 people while California gets only one for every 718,000. Each North Dakota vote is therefore worth about 2.7 times more than each California vote. The vote of every person should be treated equally.

The argument that someone living in North Dakota is somehow disadvantaged and deserves almost tripling of the value of their vote is without merit. Deprived how? They already enjoy more political power than they deserve, with an equal number of two senators for a population in North Dakota that’s only 1/40th of that of California.

Add in the disenfranchising vagaries of electoral law potentially obstructing the will of voters.

It’s hard to imagine the damage to America that could have been prevented should the 3-million popular vote advantage garnered by Clinton over Trump have been the law of the land. What a shame.

Raymond Hult

Bountiful