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Letter: Trump — a thistle or a fruit tree?

President Donald Trump speaks with reporters after participating in a video teleconference call with members of the military on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020, at the White House in Washington.
Patrick Semansky, Associated Press

Joan Rond was given some sound advice (“Letter: Whether it’s churches or politicians, know them by their fruits,” Nov. 23). A friend used scripture to tell her that one can know if something is good by the fruit it bears. Grapes don’t come from thorns or figs from thistles. In the last half of her letter, she speaks of applying this same advice to various leaders. Although not mentioning President Donald Trump by name, she implies he is as a thistle and takes some nasty swipes at him.

As a reminder to Ms. Rond, the scripture also says “A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.” Recently, results of just one of the many “good fruits” from the Trump tree became evident. The U.S. Supreme Court struck down the edict by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, D-N.Y., restricting religious gatherings at houses of worship while allowing relatively large gatherings at other locations. The First Amendment and equal protection clause of the Constitution apply. If you love the Constitution, President Trump’s appointment of three constitutionalist justices to the Supreme Court is very good fruit.

There is much more. For example, his leadership on Operation Warp Speed will give the world a COVID-19 vaccine in months, not years. His foreign policies have created alliances for peace and cooperation between several Middle-East countries, resulting in five Nobel Peace Prize nominations for him. Our president’s pro-growth policies have led to greater prosperity, less poverty and record low unemployment in our country. Many other good fruits from this president exist, but due to obvious anti-Trump bias, you have to be willing to look for them in the real orchard, not the political swamp or the media desert.

Ron Paxton

Perry