clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

‘Brain fog’ is the latest COVID-19 symptom doctors are worried about

Researchers recently talked about a lingering symptom called ‘brain fog.’

Jackson Griesmyer, 13, gets a COVID-19 test at Pleasant Grove Recreation Center on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. On Thursday, Pleasant Grove High School will pivot from full-time in-person learning to a modified schedule due to an uptick of COVID-19 cases.
Jackson Griesmyer, 13, gets a COVID-19 test at Pleasant Grove Recreation Center on Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. On Thursday, Pleasant Grove High School will pivot from full-time in-person learning to a modified schedule due to an uptick of COVID-19 cases.
Laura Seitz, Deseret News

Researchers recently expressed concern about a lingering COVID-19 symptom — brain fog.

What is brain fog?

Brain fog is a new symptom that has been seen in recovered COVID-19 patients.

Dr. Shruti Agnihotri, a neurologist at the University of Alabama Birmingham, told ABC 33/40 that she has spoken with several patients about the condition, in which people suffer from severe headaches and memory loss.

  • “Often times these patients may have even recovered from the initial fever and shortness of breath symptoms and they continue to have very severe headaches and tend to often complain about memory loss, often referred to as a brain fog.”

The symptoms are similar to what people see during a concussion, she said.

  • “Patients often times describe difficulty with attention, focus, just not feeling right, not as sharp as they have otherwise been. We sometimes see these symptoms in many other conditions, during post-concussion, and we also see them after various other infections too,” Agnihotri told ABC 33/40.

Another ‘long COVID’ symptom?

Doctors recently told Reuters that patients are suffering from “Long COVID” — a series of symptoms that last long after the initial wave of symptoms — in multiple parties of the body.

A report from Britain’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) said symptoms will hit one part of your body before shifting to another, keep symptoms around for a long time rather than the first two weeks.

  • “This review highlights the detrimental physical and psychological impact that ongoing COVID is having on many people’s lives,” Dr. Elaine Maxwell, who led the report, told Reuters.