clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

4 places where you’re most likely to get COVID-19

A new study suggests 4 places where you’re likely to get the novel coronavirus.

Newly sanitized weights await use as Terry Sullivan, general manager of Fondren Fitness, a Jackson, Miss., fitness center, background, cleans a workout machine, Thursday, May 14, 2020.
Newly sanitized weights await use as Terry Sullivan, general manager of Fondren Fitness, a Jackson, Miss., fitness center, background, cleans a workout machine, Thursday, May 14, 2020.
Rogelio V. Solis, Associated Press

A new study suggests there are four places where you’re more likely to get infected with the novel coronavirus compared to other locations.

What’s going on?

The study — published in the journal Nature Tuesday — outlined locations within the 10% of locations that account for 80% of infections.

  • This means that 10% of points-of-interest account for more than 90% of cases.

Those locations are:

  • Restaurants.
  • Gyms.
  • Hotels.
  • Houses of worship

Other “points of interest” that can lead to transmission include:

  • Grocery stores.
  • Cafes and snack bars.
  • Doctor’s offices.

The study said income could play a role, too. Those in low-income areas are more likely to be infected with COVID-19 even when you compare similar circumstances.

  • “Our model predicts that one visit to a grocery store is twice more dangerous for a lower-income individual compared to a higher-income individual,” Leskovec said, according to the New York Post.
  • “This is because of grocery stores visited by lower-income individuals have on average 60% more people by square foot, and visitors stay there 17% longer.”

Key quote:

“These are places that are smaller, more crowded and people dwell there longer.” — study co-author and Stanford University Professor Jure Leskovec said at a media briefing on the research, according to CNN

Yes, but:

The researchers said these locations don’t have to shut down, though. Reducing capacity to 20% could stop transmission by 80%, the study said.

  • “Our work highlights that it doesn’t have to be all or nothing,” Leskovec said.

Method:

The study analyzed cellphone data from 98 million Americans in 10 major cities, including New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston.