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A simple list of who likely gets the COVID-19 vaccine first

USA Today has a new graphic that outlines who will receive the COVID-19 vaccine first.

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Nursing staff administer flu vaccines to high risk group patients, outdoors to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, in Trelleborg, southern Sweden, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.

Nursing staff administer flu vaccines to high risk group patients, outdoors to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, in Trelleborg, southern Sweden, Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.

Associated Press

People across the world received relatively good news about the coronavirus pandemic this week, as Pfizer and Moderna both announced positive results for their COVID-19 vaccine trials.

News picked up soon after reports the novel coronavirus vaccine would soon be available for at-risk individuals, likely beginning in December. The rest of the population will likely see the vaccine distributed between March and July 2021.

Keeping track of who gets the COVID-19 vaccine first can be confusing. USA Today has shared information from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine that has come up with a plan for how to distribute.

Here’s how it breaks down:

Phase 1a (5% of U.S. population):

  • Front-line health workers
  • Ambulance drivers
  • Cleaners
  • First responders

Phase 1b (10% of the population):

  • Those with underlying conditions that put them at high risk.
  • Those with two or more chronic conditions.
  • People 65 and older in group living facilities.

Phase 2 (30% to 35% of population):

  • Teachers and child care workers
  • Those with an underlying condition that pits them at moderately higher risk.
  • All people under 65 in prisons, jails and detention centers.

Phase 3 (40 to 45% of the population):

  • Young adults
  • Children
  • People who work at hotels, banks, higher education, factories

Phase 4 (5 to 15% of the population):

  • Everyone else

Until then ...

Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said recently that the calvary is coming with the COVID-19 vaccine. But until then, people need to stay vigilant.

  • “I’ve used that metaphor that the cavalry is on the way,” said Fauci, according to The Hill. “If you’re fighting a battle, and the cavalry is on the way, you don’t stop shooting. You keep going until the calvary gets here.”