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People who recently tested positive for COVID-19 are voting in person. Here’s how

The CDC said people who recently tested positive for COVID-19 can vote in person

Clemintine Banks, front right, changes gloves after handing a ballot to a person who tested positive for COVID-19 during curbside voting at the St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners on Locust Street, around the corner from board offices in downtown St. Louis, Monday, Nov. 2, 2020.
Clemintine Banks, front right, changes gloves after handing a ballot to a person who tested positive for COVID-19 during curbside voting at the St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners on Locust Street, around the corner from board offices in downtown St. Louis, Monday, Nov. 2, 2020.
AP

People who have tested positive for the novel coronavirus are voting in the 2020 election, and that doesn’t defy any national safety guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What’s going on?

The CDC updated its guidelines Sunday to allow people who have tested positive for COVID-19 to vote in person in the 2020 election.

The CDC said voters who have tested positive or been exposed to the virus should do the following:

  • Wear a mask.
  • Stay 6 feet away from others.
  • Sanitize your hands before and after voting.

The CDC said: “You should also let poll workers know that you are sick or in quarantine when you arrive at the polling location.”

What it looks like:

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch captured photos of voters with COVID-19 participating in curbside voting. The voters were met by St. Louis Board of Election Commissioners members, who wore protective suits to stay safe from the virus.

Why it matters:

As The Washington Post reports, people who may have tested positive for COVID-19, or who might have been exposed to the virus, may have missed the cut-off point to request a ballot. So going to the polls is the only way they can vote in person.

“But the prospect of casting a ballot alongside someone who is sick is unlikely to defuse the tension surrounding mask-wearing at polling places — something that remains optional in multiple states,” The Washington Post reports.