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This new study has some good news for concertgoers during the pandemic

New study says people could attend concerts during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Eagles, consisting of longtime members Don Henley, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit and Steuart Smith, plus Vince Gill and Deacon Frey, perform “An Evening with the Eagles” in Salt Lake City, May 20, 2018 at Vivint Arena.
The Eagles, consisting of longtime members Don Henley, Joe Walsh, Timothy B. Schmit and Steuart Smith, plus Vince Gill and Deacon Frey, perform “An Evening with the Eagles” in Salt Lake City, May 20, 2018 at Vivint Arena.
Keith J. Johnson

A new study from German researchers suggests there could be “low to very low” impact of coronavirus for people who attend concerts indoors.

The study — which was mainly an analysis of indoor concerts staged by scientists — found there was low transmission of COVID-19 as long as organizers had “adequate ventilation, strict hygiene protocols and limited capacity,” The New York Times reports.

  • “There is no argument for not having such a concert,” Dr. Michael Gekle, part of the team at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg who conducted the study, told The New York Times. “The risk of getting infected is very low.”

The study has not been peer-reviewed.

For the test case, researchers tested each concertgoer for the coronavirus and checked their temperatures. Each candidate was asked to disinfect their hands and given a location tracker.

  • Over 10 hours, the researchers simulated some social distancing. There were breaks, and scenarios played out where the concertgoers bought food and drinks.
  • There was one scenario in the 10 hours where the participants did not practice social distancing, while two others where there was a strict distance and one with a “checkerboard” formation, according to The New York Times.

Bigger picture:

There has been some additional research done on how to conduct concerts safely during the pandemic. In fact, the Utah Symphony was a test case for how to manage concerts in the pandemic, accounting for airflow and the use of instruments, as the Deseret News reported.