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Worried about coronavirus? These 2 quotes will calm your fears

Experts told NBC News that most cases will be mild

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This undated file image released by the British Health Protection Agency shows an electron microscope image of a coronavirus, part of a family of viruses that cause ailments including the common cold and SARS, which was first identified last year.

This undated file image released by the British Health Protection Agency shows an electron microscope image of a coronavirus, part of a family of viruses that cause ailments including the common cold and SARS, which was first identified last year.

Health Protection Agency, Associated Press

Coronavirus continues to spread throughout the United States just like it has throughout the world. Concerns over the virus sent the stock market plunging last week. And now, with deaths reported in Washington state, it’s no question fear could play a role.

But experts recently told NBC News that there isn’t any reason to panic. In fact, two key quotes from these experts should calm your fears about the coronavirus and its impact on your life.

“The one thing we really don’t need is mass hysteria. Eighty percent of people have such minor symptoms, they don’t actually require any medical care at all. The 20 percent who do feel quite ill need to be evaluated, and some of them will require hospitalization and some of them will require intensive care.”

— Dr. Robert Murphy, executive director of the Institute for Global Health at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and an infectious diseases professor.
  • Murphy said senior citizens are the most at-risk for severe symptoms. Those with underlying conditions — like cancer, diabetes or those with cardiovascular or lung disease — could be at risk, too.

“The vast majority of cases are going to be mild, and people are going to recover just like they do from a cold or flu-like illness.”

— Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.
  • Adalja said those with more serious cases will want to notify the hospital ahead of time so they can prepare potential treatments. There may even be a special entrance for you.

One more consideration

Howard P. Forman, a professor at Yale University, said in a recent Yale Insights interview that you shouldn’t be panicked about what’s going on, either.

  • “There is absolutely going to be an explosion in the number of identified cases,” Forman told Yale Insights. “But how fast that number increases is highly dependent on how fast we can test.”