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These U.S. states beat back COVID-19. Here’s why it came back

Multiple states stopped COVID-19 at the beginning of the pandemic. Here’s why it came back

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Pedestrians wear masks as they cross a street amid the coronavirus pandemic Sunday, July 12, 2020, in Santa Monica, Calif. A heat wave has brought crowds to California’s beaches as the state grappled with a spike in coronavirus infections and hospitalizations.

Pedestrians wear masks as they cross a street amid the coronavirus pandemic on Sunday, July 12, 2020, in Santa Monica, Calif. A heat wave has brought crowds to California’s beaches as the state grappled with a spike in coronavirus infections and hospitalizations.

Marcio Jose Sanchez, Associated Press

Multiple states that beat back the novel coronavirus now face a new surge of cases, and experts suggest they know the reasons why it’s happening.

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What’s going on:

States like California, Louisiana, Michigan and Washington state suffered a lot from the first wave of infections from the coronavirus.

Recently, these states have seen cases climb again. For example, California reported 3,322 new coronavirus cases and 18 deaths on Sunday, per The Los Angeles Times.

Experts said the resurgence is likely due to multiple causes. Here’s what the experts told Bloomberg:

They include a population no longer willing to stay inside, Republicans who refuse face masks as a political statement, street protests over police violence and young people convinced the virus won’t seriously hurt them. And even though some of the states led by Democratic governors delayed restarting their economies until weeks after more eager peers like Georgia, they still jumped too soon, critics say.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo — whose state, along with Massachusetts and New Jersey, were hit hard by the coronavirus in the beginning — warned of a rebound of cases, according to Bloomberg.

Cuomo said: “We’re going to go through an increase, and I can feel it coming. The only question is how far up our rate goes. But you can’t have it all across the country and then have it not come back.”

Is this the ‘second wave’ of COVID-19?

It’s unclear whether or not we’re currently in a wave or not. As Kaiser Health News points out, a wave requires a steep climb and then a steep drop. A rise and peak would signal a new wave. Some states have seen a rise and fall, like a wave, where as others have remained relatively flat and plateaued at best.

In states with increases, “it would not be accurate to talk about a second wave,” said Nicole Gatto, an associate professor in the School of Community and Global Health at Claremont Graduate University in California, according to KHN.

“What causes those peaks, and whether or not there will be more than one peak, as opposed to one continuous wave, will be human behavior and how humans react to what is going on around them.”