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Your blood type might not matter at all for COVID-19 risk, new studies suggest

Those with Type A blood might not be at a greater risk for COVID-19

SHARE Your blood type might not matter at all for COVID-19 risk, new studies suggest
In this June 12, 2020, file photo, a health worker draws blood for COVID-19 antibody testing in Dearborn, Mich. A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients published Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests a person’s blood type may have some influence on whether they develop severe disease.

In this June 12, 2020, file photo, a health worker draws blood for COVID-19 antibody testing in Dearborn, Mich. A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients published Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests a person’s blood type may have some influence on whether they develop severe disease.

Paul Sancya, Associated Press

Two new studies suggest that blood type might not matter when it comes to the severity of one’s COVID-19 risk, despite earlier research that showed those with Type A blood might be more at risk.

What’s new?

  • Studies from Massachusetts General Hospital and the other at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York didn’t find any connection between those with Type A blood having higher odds of getting COVID-19, according to The New York Times.
  • However, those with Type O are reportedly less likely to be infected, according to The New York Times.
  • But the impact is small. Researchers said you shouldn’t count on it.
  • Nicholas Tatonetti, a data scientist at Columbia University, told The New York Times: “No one should think they’re protected.”
  • Researchers found those with Type A blood had a somewhat lower risk of going on ventilators. Those with Type AB were at higher risk. But the scientists said there were few patients with that blood type in the study.

But what about earlier research?

  • Earlier this month, a genetic analysis of patients with COVID-19 found certain blood types might have been more immune than others, as I wrote about for Deseret.com.
  • The scientists reviewed genes from thousands of coronavirus patients.
  • Type Apatients were more likely to have a severe reaction the disease, according to that analysis. Type Opatients were less likely.
  • “Our genetic data confirm that blood group O is associated with a risk of acquiring COVID-19 that was lower than that in non-O blood groups, whereas blood group A was associated with a higher risk than non-A blood groups,” researchers concluded.