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Is Europe about to see a second wave of the coronavirus?

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson told Sky News, “I’m afraid you are starting to see in some places the signs of a second wave of the pandemic.”

People sit in a nearly empty restaurant in the Balearic Islands capital of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Concerns over a new wave of coronavirus infections brought on by returning vacationers are wreaking havoc across Spain’s tourism industry, particularly in the Balearic Islands following Britain’s effective ban on travel to the country.
People sit in a nearly empty restaurant in the Balearic Islands capital of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Concerns over a new wave of coronavirus infections brought on by returning vacationers are wreaking havoc across Spain’s tourism industry, particularly in the Balearic Islands following Britain’s effective ban on travel to the country.
AP

Europe is starting to take safety measures in order to protect itself from a total shutdown because a potential second wave of coronavirus. This comes as certain countries see COVID-19 numbers spike for the first time since spring.

Spain, Germany, France, Belgium, and the UK are among countries to see their numbers rise lately. According to Business Insider, daily cases in Belgium have risen from 80 to 279, and France has seen a jump from 434 to 677. Spain has seen a 260% rise in daily cases.

Europe has slowly started to re-open for travel as restrictions began to lift in June. As of July 1, international tourists from certain countries have been allowed to visit the continent.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson imposed a 14-day quarantine for anyone traveling from Spain to the UK, over the weekend, according to NPR.

Johnson told Sky News, “What we have to do is take swift and decisive action where we think that the risks are starting to bubble up again,”

Germany took a less formal step by advising people not to travel to the regions of Aragon, Navarra, and Catalonia in Spain as that's where most of Spain’s cases are coming from at the moment.

Spain Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said the UK made an “error” and their decision is “unjust,” reiterating that the spike in cases comes from two regions located in northern Spain, per NPR.

Spain is currently in talks with British authorities, urging them to reconsider the mandatory quarantine.

“We are always looking at ways in which we can mitigate the impact of the quarantine, try to help people, try to make sure that the science is working to help travellers and holidaymakers,” Johnson said on the issue, per Sky News.

According to Lothar Wielder, who is the head of the German infectious disease agency, the rise in cases is most likely connected to people traveling and engaging in leisure activities, celebrations, and returning to work.

Wielder and Johnson both agree that a second wave can be possibly avoided if people wear masks, wash hands and maintain social distancing.

Per NPR, Johnson said, “Everybody knows what the rules are. That’s how we’ll help ourselves.”