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Should you host a baby shower during the pandemic? Read what happened to a pregnant teacher in Brazil

A pregnant teacher in Brazil passed away from the coronavirus after her friends held a surprise baby shower.

A full moon rises between the arches of the Planalto Presidential Palace amid the new coronavirus pandemic, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020.
A full moon rises between the arches of the Planalto Presidential Palace amid the new coronavirus pandemic, in Brasilia, Brazil, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020.
Eraldo Peres, Associated Press

A pregnant teacher in Brazil has died after her friends held a surprise baby shower for her during the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple reports.

What happened:

Camila Graciano spent most of her time during the pandemic at home because of her pregnancy. She came into contact with others when she attended a surprise baby shower hosted by her friends, the Brazilian news outlet Globo reported.

  • The guest with the novel coronavirus did not show any symptoms at the time, which means he or she “unknowingly spread the virus to other partygoers,” the New York Post reports.

Graciano was rushed to the hospital. She gave birth after an emergency C-section. The baby was born healthy but the coronavirus left the mom struggling in the hospital.

  • Graciano’s brother, Daniel Helio Ambrosio, told KRON: “After the birth, my sister showed significant improvement,” Ambrosio said. “The doctors even sent us a message saying, ‘Listen, have faith, because her lungs are improving, the heartbeat is improving (and) her blood pressure is improving.’”

Small gatherings worry experts

Multiple researchers and scientists worry about how small gatherings could hurt Americans during the pandemic, especially with a holiday weekend coming up, as I wrote for Deseret.com.

Small gatherings are worrisome because people believe there won’t be a huge chance of infection since there’s less people. But that’s not always the case.

  • “People don’t think of it in the same way as the (President) Trump rally in Tulsa, a bunch of people on the beach or in the bars, but these small events add up to a lot. It’s just invisible,” Dr. Peter Chin-Hong, a professor of medicine at the University of California-San Francisco, told USA Today.
  • “Small gatherings are a concern because there’s so many of them. They may account for a much greater proportion of the cases than we think right now,’’ said Dr. George Rutherford, a colleague of Chin-Hong’s at UCSF, told USA Today.