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Tropical Storm Paulette is a ‘zombie’ storm that has come back to life

What is a ‘zombie’ storm? The National Weather Service explained what Tropical Storm Paulette is doing now.

This GOES-16 GeoColor satellite image taken Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, at 12:20 p.m. EDT., and provided by NOAA, shows Hurricane Teddy, center, in the Atlantic, Tropical Depression 22, left, in the Gulf of Mexico, the remnants Paulette, top right, and Tropical Storm Wilfred, lower right. Forecasters have run out of traditional names for the Atlantic hurricane season
This GOES-16 GeoColor satellite image taken Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, at 12:20 p.m. EDT., and provided by NOAA, shows Hurricane Teddy, center, in the Atlantic, Tropical Depression 22, left, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the remnants of Paulette, top right, and Tropical Storm Wilfred, lower right. Forecasters have run out of traditional names for the Atlantic hurricane season
NOAA via Associated Press

Tropical Storm Paulette has been brought back to life, becoming a “zombie” storm during the 2020 hurricane season, according to the National Weather Service.

NWS said: “Because 2020, we now have Zombie Tropical Storms. Welcome back to the land of the living, Tropical Storm #Paulette”

  • Paulette hit Bermuda as a Category 1 storm and then became a Category 2 on Sept. 14. The storm lost speed and become “a post-tropical low-pressure system,” according to CNN.
  • Now, Paulette regained strength and became a tropical storm again.

Paulette formed back in September as one of the five ongoing storms in the Atlantic Ocean. At the time, the National Hurricane Center identified seven different storms working all at once.

The Washington Post reported at the time that 2020 had a rather busy storm system:

  • “The jam-packed hurricane season has featured the earliest C, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P and R storms on record, with four names left on the 2020 list before we revert to the Greek alphabet in assigning tropical storm and hurricane names. A typical season contains closer to 11 tropical named storms.”