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A new major snowstorm is coming to the U.S. Here’s what to expect

The Midwest, South and East Coast will see a major storm

SHARE A new major snowstorm is coming to the U.S. Here’s what to expect
Chris Kent catches a ball in the snow.

Chris Kent, 11, reacts as he catches a ball in the snow at Sugar House Park in Salt Lake City on Friday, Dec. 31, 2021.

Shafkat Anowar, Deseret News

A new major snowstorm will impact millions of people across the country, hitting the Midwest, the South and the East Coast.

What’s happening: Another major snowstorm will create massive travel issues for people from North Dakota to Georgia and even those in Maine.

  • The Midwest will see the first signs of snow, hitting the Dakotas, western Minnesota and Iowa, according to AccuWeather.
  • The snow storm will bring “hefty snow amounts, significant icing, heavy rain and gusty winds” across the East Coast and inland areas, per AccuWeather.

Quotes: “Get ready, a major snowstorm is coming,” AccuWeather meteorologist Bernie Rayno said, per USA Today.

  • “There will be a band of heavy snow that generally extends from the eastern Dakotas and Minnesota southward to at least much of Missouri and maybe the Ozarks in Arkansas,” said AccuWeather meteorologist Matt Benz, according to USA Today.
  • “It looks like a very strong storm system will unleash very significant snow across the interior parts of the Northeast, especially from the Appalachians up into the high ground of New York state and into northern New England,” AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Jon Porter said. “In some locations, the snow can be measured in feet.”

Watch to watch for: Per Weather.com, the worst of the storm will be in areas where there have been winter storm watches and warnings. Driving will become dangerous in these areas.

  • “There are still some uncertainties in the forecast, including exactly where low pressure tracks and where the below-freezing air near the ground will set up and for how long,” according to Weather.com. “This could lead to changes in the forecast in the next day or so, which is typical for most winter storms.”